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Hotel Montecarlo
The Advantages

Termini Station and Means of Transport

Termini station is the main railway station of Rome, the arrival and departure point for shuttles to and from Rome’s two airports: Ciampino and Fiumicino.
In addition, located in front of the station, in Piazza dei Cinquecento, is the bus terminal for all the main bus lines, a very convenient base from which to start on the discovery of Rome’s marvels. Immediately outside the station, you will also find many Taxis.

Inside Termini station, there is the Forum Termini shopping centre furnished with numerous stores and businesses where to shop at competitive prices without going too far from the hotel. If you are looking for phone, computer, photo and optics, audio and video, music, film, videogames, and hi-tech products, but also clothes, jewellery, makeup and beauty products, shoes, scarfs and underwear, Forum Termini is the ideal place.

In Rome, public transport is the best way to travel in the city: metro, bus and tram provide comfortable transport to all of the capital’s points of interest.
Within a short distance of the Hotel, you will find the stops of buses 16, 61, 62, 75, 82, 492; and after a short walk, you will reach the B Line Castro Pretorio metro stop. The Termini station is also the location of the intersection of Rome’s two metro lines (A and B Lines).

Embassies and Consulates

The offices of a considerable number of embassies and consulates are located close to the hotel; most can be reached on foot.

They include:

• Embassy of Turkey (Via Palestro, 28)
• Embassy of the Russian Federation (Via Gaeta, 5)
• Consulate of Germany (Via San Martino della Battaglia, 4)
• Embassy of Japan (Via Quintino Sella, 60)
• Embassy of India (Via XX Settembre, 5)
• Embassy of Great Britain (Via XX Settembre, 80a)
• Embassy of France in Vatican (Via Piave, 23)
• Consulate of Burkina Faso (Via XX Settembre, 86)
• Embassy of the Argentine Republic (Via Vittorio Veneto, 7)
• Embassy of the United States of America (Via Vittorio Veneto, 119)

Ministries, Public Authorities and Trade Unions

By staying at Hotel Montecarlo, those coming to Rome on business will appreciate not only our services and the convenience of close-by public transport, but also the proximity of Termini Station, Ministry offices, important Public authorities and the primary Trade unions, which place our hotel in one of the capital’s most important nerve centres.

Ministries:

• Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Environmental Conservation (Via Palestro, 11)
• Ministry of Defence (Via XX Settembre, 11; Via XX Settembre, 123/A)
• Ministry of Agricultural and Forestry Policies (Via XX Settembre, 20)
• Ministry of Economy and Finance (Via XX Settembre, 97)
• Central Military Library of the Ministry of Defence (Via XX Settembre, 123)
• Ministry of Infrastructures and Transport (Piazzale di Porta Pia, 1)
• Ministry of Labour (Via Vittorio Veneto, 56)
• Ministry of Industry and Commerce (Via Vittorio Veneto, 33)
• Ministry of Interior (Piazza del Viminale, 1)
• Ministry of Interior Offices (Via Castro Pretorio, 5)

Public Authorities:

• Department of Historical, Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences of Antiquity (Via Palestro, 63)
• The US-Italy Fulbright Commission (Via Castelfidardo, 8)
• Magistrates’ Internal Board of Supervisors (Piazza Indipendenza, 6)
• MEF Libraries (Via XX Settembre, 97)
• Court of Auditors (Piazzale di Porta Pia, 1)
• Ministry of the Interior Library (Palazzo del Viminale)
• MEF State General Accounting Department (Via XX Settembre, 97)
• ICCU Library (Viale Castro Pretorio)
• Police Academy (Via del Castro Pretorio, 5)
• Library of the Institute of Music Bibliography (Via Castro Pretorio, 105)
• ICCU - Central Institute for the Union Catalogue of Italian Libraries and Bibliographic Information (Viale Castro Pretorio, 105)
• ENAC – Italian Civil Aviation Authority (Viale Castro Pretorio, 118)
• AGEA (Via Palestro, 81)
• CDP (Via Goito, 4)

Trade Unions:

• CGL N.I.Di.L. (Via Palestro 78)
• F.N.P. CISL (Via Castelfidardo, 47)
• FILCA CISL - Italian Federation of Construction and Allied Workers (Via del Viminale, 43)
• ISCOS COSL– Trade Union Institute for International Cooperation (Viale Castro Pretorio, 116)
• CGIL (Corso d’Italia, 25)
• F.I.L.C.T.E.M. (Via Piemonte 32)
• F.I.L.L.E.A. (Via G. B. Morgani, 27)
• F.I.L.T. (Via Morgani 27)
• F.I.O.M. (Corso Trieste 36)
• F.I.S.A.C. (Via Vicenza 5/A)
• S.L.C. (Piazza Sallustio ,24),
• S.P.I. (Via Dei Frentani 4/A)
• U.I.L.A. (Via Savoia, 80)
• F.E.N.E.A.L. (Via Alessandria, 171)
• F.I.L.C.A. (Via Gioberti, 54)
• F.I.M. (Corso Trieste, 36)
• F.A.I. (Via Tevere, 20)
• U.G.C. (Via Piave, 66)
• CISL Medici – Federation of Medics (Via Giovanni Amendola, 46)
• F.I.B.A. (Via Messina, 46)
• F.I.S.A.S.C.A.T. (Via dei Mille, 56)

Hospitals, University…

General Hospital Umberto I: The General Hospital Umberto I of Rome, named after the Italian king of the same name, is a university hospital of the first Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University of Rome Sapienza.
It is the second largest public hospital in Italy (biggest, with about 1200 beds). Its construction initiated in 1883 by the then Minister of Public Education, the famous physician Guido Baccelli, following the project of Guilio Podesto and Filippo Laccetti. The hospital was completed 20 years later and inaugurated by the then Rector, Luigi Galassi, and by the king, to whom it was later dedicated.
Useful Telephone Numbers:
SWITCHBOARD Tel. 06 4 997.1
RECUP – REGIONAL SINGLE BOOKING CENTER FOR THE REGION OF LAZIO Tel. 803 333
CUP AZIENDALI – SINGLE BOOKING CENTER Tel. 06 49 977 911/12/13/14/15/16
DEA – EMERGENCY AND ADMISSIONS DEPARTMENT Tel. 06 49 977 025/27
TDM – TRIBUNAL FOR PATIENT’S RIGHTS Tel. 06 49 970 286
SECURITY Tel. 06 49 970 777
CENTRAL ARCHIVES Tel. 06 49 979 990
PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE Tel. 06 49 977 050
GENERAL, HEALTH AND ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTORATE Tel. 06 49 970 359

University of Rome La Sapienza: University of Rome La Sapieza, commonly known simply as La Sapienza, is one of the oldest Italian universities. It was founded by Pope Boniface VIII, who instituted this "Studium Urbis" (place of study of the city) with the Papal Bull entitled "In suprema praeminentia dignitatis" on 20 April 1303. With 129,500 registered students in 2010, it is the third largest university in Europe and the 43th largest in the world by enrolment.
Following the reorganization of 2010, it now has 11 faculties, over 60 departments, twenty-one museums and over 50 libraries.
In addition to several campuses outside Rome, the University has a satellite campus in Latina.
In 2013, La Sapienza was the only Italian university to appear in the list of the world’s one hundred best universities published by the Centre for World University Rankings, placing 62nd.
A large portion of Italian leading class (as well as that of Europe) was educated here.
Useful Telephone Numbers:
SWITCHBOARD Tel. 06 49911
URP PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICE Tel. 06 4969 0402–3-4-5
SPECIAL NEEDS OFFICE Tel. 800 410960; 06 4991 0400
SAPIENZA WIRELESS Tel. 06 4969 0113

CNR (Piazzale Aldo Moro, 7): is an Italian national public organization with the duty of carrying out, promoting, spreading and improving scientific and technologic research activities and their application towards scientific, technologic, economic and social development.
Founded on 18 November 1923 and made a state institution in 1945, it has primarily performed training, promotion and research coordination activities in all of the technologic and scientific sectors. In 1999, CNR became a “national research organization with general scientific competences and scientific research institutes distributed over Italy, which carries out activity of primary interest for the promotion of science and the progress of the Country".
Soon after the outbreak of the war, in many European countries, scientists tried to establish institutions that could aggregate all the activities related to inventions and research.In 1916, the National Committee for Science and Technology (CNST) towards the development and growth of Italian industry was founded in order to further increase the bonds between Science and its applications; while in 1917, the spending of additional 3 million lira towards the amenities and furnishings of Institutes of Physics, Chemistry and their technical applications was authorized. Also in 1917, the Invention and Research Bureau was established.
As a result of these initiatives, a greater sensibility towards the sciences was beginning to emerge. This sensibility was first glimpsed in the founding in November 1918 of the International Research Council (IRC), in which Vito Volterra, who was joined by representatives from France, England, United States and Belgium, represented Italy. It was further confirmed by the presidential decree of 17 February 1919, which established a committee “with the task of preparing a project for the construction of a National Research Council” and further stipulated that “the National Research Council must have as its goal the organization and promotion of research for scientific, industrial and national defence purposes”. This decree marks the official beginning of the process that lead to the establishment of the CNR: a process that would conclude with the issuing of legislative decree of 18 November 1923.
On 23 December 1987, CNR registered the first Italian internet domain: cnr.it
CNR is under the supervision of the Ministry of Education, University and Research.

National Library (Viale Castro Pretorio, 105): The National Central Library of Rome (BNCR) is one of Italy’s two national libraries, which have the primary task of gathering and preserving all Italian publications. It is located on Viale Castro Pretorio, not far from Termini Station. The library is also known as Vittorio Emanuele II National Library, after the king to whom it was dedicated in the year of its establishment (1875).
With about 7,000,000 printed volumes, 2,000 incunabula, 25,000 16th century volumes, 8,000 manuscripts, 10,000 prints and drawings, 20,000 geographic maps, and 1,342,154 pamphlets, it is Italy’s biggest library.
The current building, inaugurated in 1975, was constructed between 1965 and 1975 by a group of architects (Massimo Castellazzi, Tullio Dell'Anese, Annibale Vitellozzi) in the International Style, which was very popular in those years.
Services, open to all those 18 years of age or older, are free and include the consultation of all, and the loan and photocopying of some of the materials.

Monuments and Tourist Attractions

Vittoriano Complex and Piazza Venezia
The National Monument to Vittorio Emanuele II, is better known as Vittoriano or as Altare della Patria (Altar of the Fatherland), ever since the burial of an Unknown Soldier on its grounds. Its name has no relation to the term vittoria (victory); in reality, it was named after Vittorio Emanuele II of Savoia, the first king of Italy, to whom this monumental complex is dedicated.
On Foot (2.2 km; 27 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and turn left onto Via Cernaia. Follow this street all the way to Piazza della Reppublica and the “Reppublica – Teatro dell’opera” metro stop. Proceed all the way down Via Nazionale until you reach a traffic circle. Cross it, take Via IV Novembre and follow it to Piazza Venezia.
By Public Transport (3.3 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and walk down Via Palestro to the PALESTRO bus stop (about 50 meters); take bus 492 (STAZ.NE METRO CIPRO) for 10 stops and get off at the PIAZZA VENEZIA stop.

Galleria Borghese (inside Villa Borghese Park)
Here you can admire Canova’s "Venere vincitrice", better known as the portrait of Paolina Borghese, the greatest work of Bernini, and stroll through an incredibly rich art gallery containing invaluable masterpieces.
On Foot (1.9 km; 23 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro until it intersects Via XX Settembre. Turn left. Follow Via XX Settembre and then turn right onto Via Piave. Follow it to its end and turn left at the intersection with Corso Italia. Continue down Corso Italia until you reach Via Giacomo Puccini. Turn right and at the intersection with Via Pinciana turn right again. A short distance later, turn left onto Via dell’Uccelliera. Follow it to the entrance of Galleria Borghese.

Piazza di Spagna, Via Del Babuino and Piazza Del Popolo
Piazza di Spagna is one of the most well-known and evocative spots in Rome. Its characteristic feature is the long Trinità dei Monti staircase. Via del Babuino, in the Campo Marzo district, is one of the most elegant streets of Rome. It links Piazza di Spagna to Piazza del Popolo. The latter was created at the beginning of the 19th century by Valadier and is considered one of the city’s best works of urban planning.
On Foot (2.1 km; 23 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro until it intersects Via XX Settembre. Turn left and continue down until you reach Piazza San Bernardo; take a right and an immediate left onto Via Barberini. Cross Piazza Barberini and follow Via del Tritone until the intersection with Via Due Macelli; turn right and follow Via Due Macelli to your destination.
By Public Transport (2.6 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and after about 50 meters turn left once more onto Via Cernaia. Continue down until you reach the intersection with Via Orlando Vittorio Emanuele; here, turn left and cross the traffic circle to the “Repubblica - Teatro dell’Opera” metro stop. Take A Line in the BATTISTINI direction for 2 stops and get off at the “Spagna” stop.

Villa Torlonia
Villa Torlonia, the most recent of Roman noble villas, retains a certain appeal due to its unique English landscape garden, one of just a few such examples in Rome, and to the surprisingly numerous buildings and decorative artwork dispersed throughout the park.
On Foot (1.2 km; 14 minutes)
Upon exiting, take Via Montebello located directly in front of the hotel. Follow it for about 200 meters and turn right onto Viale del Policlinico. Go straight and follow Via Giovanni Battista Morgagni to the traffic circle. Turn onto Via Lazzaro Spallanzani, the first street on the left. Turn right onto Via Siracusa and follow it for about 160 meters to the entrance to the Villa’s park.
By Public Transport (2 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro to the bus stop. Take bus 62 (BOLOGNA) for 4 stops and get off at the TORLONIA/NOMENTANA stop.

The Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheatre) and the Imperial Fora
The famous architectural complex of Imperial Age, the location of circus games and gladiator duels. Originally called the Flavian Amphitheatre, it was built in 72 AD by an unknown architect. The Imperial Fora consist of a series of monumental squares constructed between 46 BC and 113 AD by the emperors of the time. The birth of the Imperial Fora marked the passage from a republic to an empire; following the example of Julius Caesar, who constructed the first of the complex’s fora, all the important emperors felt the need to leave a mark of their own by constructing a forum bearing their name.
On Foot (2.3 km; 27 minutes)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and take Via Montebello. Take the first left and follow Via Castelfidardo to Piazza Independenza. Turn right and follow Via Solferino to Piazza dei Cinquecento. Cross the square and take Via Cavour. Go down the street for about 1100 meters, to the intersection with Via degli Annibaldi. Take Via degli Annibaldi until you reach your destination.
By Public Transport (2.9 km)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro until the intersection with Via San Martino Della Battaglia; turn left and follow the street to the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop. Take the train in the LAURENTINA direction for 3 stops and get off at the “Colosseo” stop.

The Trevi Fountain
The most famous fountain of Rome and of the entire world. A contribution to its international fame was made by Federico Fellini’s film "La dolce vita". Constructed around 1735 AD, it is the work of the architect Niccolò Salvi and is fed to this day by the Aqua Virgo (Acqua Vergine) aqueduct, constructed in 19 BC by Agrippa. The building serving as the background to the fountain is Palazzo Poli, which once belonged to the Dukes of Poli.
On Foot (2 km, 23 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel, turn onto Via XX Settembre and follow it all the way to Largo S.Susanna. Turn right and then immediately left onto Via Barberini. Upon reaching Piazza Barberini, follow Via del Tritone to Largo Tritone and then take a left onto Via della Via della Stamperia. Follow it to Piazza Trevi.
By Public Transport (2.2 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel, turn onto Via XX Settembre and follow it to the XX SETTEMBRE/PIAVE bus stop at its end; take bus 62 (BORGO S. ANGELO) for 6 stops or bus 492 (STAZ.NE METRO CIPRO) and get off at the TRITONE/FONTANA TREVI stop.

Mouth of Truth and Circus Maximus
The Mouth of Truth (Bocca della Verità) in the Santa Maria in Cosmedin Basilica is considered one of Rome’s biggest curiosities and attracts thousands of visitors from around the world every year.
On Foot (3.1 km; 37 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and turn left onto Via Cernaia. Follow it until it meets Via Orlando Vittorio Emanuele and turn left; continue down the street until you reach the traffic circle and take the first right onto Via Nazionale. Having walked all the way down this famous street to Largo Magnanapoli, cross the traffic circle and continue straight until you reach Via Dei Fori Romani; keep to your left and after having passed Basilica of St. Mary of the Altar of Heaven and the Campidoglio staircase, take Via del Teatro di Marcello. Continue all the way down the street until you reach the Piazza Della Bocca Della Verità.
By Public Transport (4.3 km)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro until the intersection with Via San Martino Della Battaglia; turn left and continue straight until the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop. Take the B Line train in the LAURENTINA direction for 4 stops. Get off at the “Circo Massimo” stop and proceed towards Via Del Circo Massimo. Walk all the way down this street. Situated at its end is the roman church Santa Maria in Cosmedin. The Mouth of Truth is located in its portico characterized by five naves.

Piazza Navona, the Pantheon, the Church of St. Louis of the French, and Campo de’ Fiori
Piazza Navona, built on the site of the ancient Stadium of Domitian, constructed by the Emperor Domitian in 85 AD, is one of Rome’s most beautiful and famous squares. It is encircles by the masterpieces of Gian Lorenzo Bernini (the Fountain of Four Rivers in the centre of the square), Francesco Borromini (the Church of Saint Agnes in Agony) and Giacomo della Porta (the author of the frescos in the Doria Pamphilj Gallery), some of the most important examples of Baroque art. The Church of St. Louis of the French, which was built in 1589 and houses artwork by Caravaggio, including the Martyrdom of St. Matthew, the Calling of St. Matthew and St. Matthew and the Angel, and the Pantheon are located nearby. The Pantheon, built by Emperor Hadrian, it is one of the symbols of Rome and one of the best-preserved monuments of the ancient world.
On Foot (2.9 km; 29 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and turn left unto Via XX Settembre. Continue all the way down to Piazza San Bernardo. Once on the square, turn right and then immediately left onto Via Barberini. Cross the traffic circle and continue down Via Del Tritone. Follow Largo Chigi and veer left onto Via Del Corso at the fork in the road. Walk past Piazza Colonna and continue on Via della Colonna Antonina. Continue going straight and after having passed Via In Aquiro you will reach Piazza Della Maddalena. Turn left onto Via Della Rosetta, and after about 50 meters turn right onto Via Giustiniani. Continue down Via Del Salvatore and after another 50 meters, turn left onto Corso del Rinascimento. Turn right onto Corsia Agonale and continue until you reach your destination.
By Public Transport (4.2 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and head for the PALESTRO bus stop. Take bus 492 (STAZ.NE METRO CIPRO) for 13 stops and get off at the SENATO stop on Corso Rinascimento. Follow Corsia Agonale to get to Piazza Navona.

Castel Sant’Angelo and St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican
Castel Sant’Angelo was constructed by the Emperor Hadrian to serve as his mausoleum in 130 AD and received the imperial remains of members of the dynasty up to Caracalla. Today, it is the seat of the National Museum of Castel Sant’Angelo. St. Peter’s Basilica is the most solemn and grandiose Church of Rome. Dominated by an imposing dome designed by Michelangelo, it faces the evocative St. Peter’s Square (Piazza San Pietro), designed by Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
On Foot (3.6 km; 46 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro to Via XX Settembre. Turn left. Continue down the street until Via Antonio Salandra; turn right. Keep to the left and turn onto Via di San Nicola da Tolentino. Cross the traffic circle and continue down Via Del Tritone. At the end of the street, turn right and follow Via Del Corso until the intersection with Piazza San Lorenzo. After about 100 meters, turn right onto Via del Leoncino. After a short distance, turn left onto Via del Leone. Continue straight following Via del Clementino and then Via di Monte Brianzo until you reach Lungotevere Tor di Nona. Follow Lungotevere Tor di Nona until Ponte Sant’Angelo (Sant’Angelo Bridge). After having reached Castel Sant’Angelo, turn left onto Lungotevere Castello and then take Via della Conciliazione, which will take you to St. Peter’s Basilica.
By Public Transport (4.8 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel. Turn onto Via XX Settembre and follow it to the XX SETTEMBRE/PIAVE bus stop. Take bus 62 (BORGO S. ANGELO) for 15 stops and get off at the PONTE VITTORIO EMANUELE stop. Follow Via Paola to Ponte Sant’Angelo (Sant’Angelo Bridge).

Trastevere
Trastevere, the 13th district of Rome, retains its characteristic atmosphere to this day thanks to its winding sanpietrini (cobblestone) streets lined with medieval residential buildings. At night, it is filled with life due its multitude of typical Roman restaurants, pizza shops and pubs of all price ranges, as well as its cinemas, markets (the market of San Cosimato has recently been restored), banks, pharmacies, supermarkets, shops of all kinds and elegant boutiques.
On Foot (3.5 km; 43 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and turn left onto Via Cernaia. Follow it all the way down to Piazza della Repubblica, which will be on your left. Cross the traffic circle and continue down Via Nazionale. At the traffic circle, take the first right, Largo Magnanapoli. Continue down Via IV Novembre until it crosses Via dei Fori Imperiali. Veer towards the left onto Piazza Venezia. Continue straight onto Via delle Botteghe Oscure. Follow it as it becomes Via Florida and after about 200 meters, turn left onto Largo Arenula. Follow Via Arenula and cross Ponte Garibaldi (Garibaldi Bridge) to your destination.
By Public Transport (4.3 km)
Go left upon exiting your hotel and proceed to the PALESTRO bus stop. Take bus 492 (STAZ.NE METRO CIPRO) for 11 stops and get off at the ARGENTINA stop. Take bus 8 (CASALETTO) for 2 stops and get off at the BELLI stop.

The Baths of Diocletian and the National Museum of Rome
The Baths of Diocletian are ancient Rome’s largest public baths. They were built to serve the Quirinale, Viminale and Esquilino neighbourhoods and required the levelling of an entire neighbourhood. Today, they host one of the seats of the National Museum of Rome: one of the greatest collections of archaeological artefacts in the world. With the purchase of just one entrée ticket, you can visit not only the Baths and the National Museum, but also Palazzo Altemps (Piazza di San Apollinare 44, not far from Piazza Navona) and Crypta Balbi (Via delle Botteghe Oscure 3). The other seat of the National Museum is located in Palazzo Massimo and can be quickly reached by crossing Piazza Dei Cinquecento.
On Foot (750 metres; 9 minutes)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and after about 120 metres turn onto Via Gaeta. Follow it to its end and turn right onto Viale Enrico de Nicola. After another 100 meters, you will find yourself at the entrance to the Baths and the Museum.
By Public Transport (1.5 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and proceed to the PALESTRO bus stop. Take bus 75 (XX SETTEMBRE) for 3 stops and get off at the TERMINI stop. Once off the bus, cross Piazza dei Cinquecento and head right to Viale Enrico de Nicola. After 100 meters, you will arrive to the fascinating Museum entrance.

Galleria Alberto Sordi and Via Del Corso
Galleria Alberto Sordi (Galleria Colonna in the past) is located in Piazza Colonna and was inaugurated in 1922. Following the 2003 restoration, it was renamed after the great Roman actor, who passed away that year. A space in the city centre dedicated not only to shopping: in addition to shops and fashion boutiques, it hosts shows, exhibitions, concerts and events. The Galleria borders Via del Corso, which links Piazza Venezia and Piazza del Popolo and is Rome’s most famous street for high-end shopping.
On Foot (2.2 km; 26 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and proceed all the way down Via Palestro. Turn left onto Via XX Settembre and then right onto Via Antonio Salandra. Continue onto Via Giosuè Carducci and then Via di San Nicola da Tolentino. After crossing the Piazza Barbierini traffic circle, take Via Del Tritone all the way to Largo Chigi and then turn left onto Via Del Corso.
By Public Transport (2.5 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel. Turn onto Via XX Settembre and continue to the XX SETTEMBRE/PIAVE bus stop. Tale bus 62 (BORGO S. ANGELO) for 7 stops or bus 492 (STAZ.NE METRO CIPRO) and get off at the SAN CLAUDIO stop. Walk a short distance further down Via Largo Chigi and turn left onto Via Del Corso.

Forum Termini
At the Rome Termini Station shopping centre you can find a little bit of everything: telephone, computer, photo, optical, audio and video products, home appliances, air conditioners, music, movies, videogames, hi-fi and hi-tech products, as well as men’s, women’s, young adult and child clothing. In addition, you will find jewellery, make-up, beauty products, shoes and underwear.
On Foot (1.1 km; 12 minutes)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and after about 120 meters turn onto Via Gaeta. Turn right onto Viale Enrico de Nicola and then left onto Piazza dei Cinquecento. Cross the square and continue onto Via Giovanni Giolitti. You have arrived.
By Public Transport (1.5 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and head for the PALESTRO bus stop. Take bus 75 (XX SETTEMBRE) for 3 stops and get off at the TERMINI stop.

Piazza della Repubblica and the Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels and the Martyrs
Piazza della Repubblica, or Piazza Esedra as it is still known to the locals, is a Roman square located a few hundred meters from the Termini station, in front of the Baths of Diocletian. One of the city’s most famous streets, Via Nazionale, leads away from this square.
The old name of this square, still very common today, derives from the great “esedra” (exedra) of the Roman baths, the perimeter of which is marked by the square’s semi-circular colonnade. The arcades that adorn the square were constructed in memory of the ancient building that once stood here.
The square plays host to the Basilica of St. Mary of the Angels and the Martyrs, built by incorporating one of the wings of the Roman Imperial Baths.
The church was constructed in 1563-1566, following a project by Michelangelo, incorporating the "tepidarium", a room for warm water baths, which now constitutes the church’s vestibule. The eight, imposing, monolithic columns of red granite, which were once part of the baths, can be glimpsed partially hidden by the floor of the church, which Michelangelo had to elevate by two metres. The church has been restored several times with the most extensive restoration performed by Luigi Vanvitelli in 1749. Because he had to add a chapel dedicated to the blessed Nicola Albergati, Vanvitelli changed the orientation of the basilica, shifting the church entrance to its south face, towards Piazza della Repubblica, and sealing the entrance designed by Michelangelo, which was positioned in the eastern face, opening onto Piazza dei Cinquecento. The façade was now constituted by the rounded, brick wall, which once served as a divisory wall in the ancient baths. The church houses the tombs of three protagonists of the First World War: the Prime Minister of the time, Vittorio Emanuele Orlando; Admiral Paolo Thaon Revel; and Marshal Armando Diaz. The apse, on the other hand, houses the tomb of Pope Pius IV.
On Foot (800 metres; 10 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and continue until you reach the intersection with Via Cernaia. Turn left and proceed to the street’s end crossing Piazza delle Finanze and continuing along Via Cernaia until it crosses Via Giuseppe Romita. Turn left and follow this street to Piazza Della Repubblica.
By Public Transport (1.6 km)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and head towards the PALESTRO bus stop. Take bus 75 (XX SETTEMBRE) for three stops and get off at the TERMINI stop. After getting of the bus, cross Piazza dei Cinquecento, take Viale Luigi Einaudi and follow it to Piazza Della Repubblica.

Via Nazionale
Via Nazionale is a street in Rome that leads from Piazza della Repubblica to Piazza Venezia, crossing Largo Magnanapoli and running through the districts of Castro Pretorio and Monti.
Via Nazionale partly follows the path of the ancient Roman road, “Vicul Longus”. The construction of the street lead to the demolition of the last remnants of the Baths of Constantine and the cutting of an artificial embankment supported by a retaining wall on which the Baths were positioned: the same rise that to this day serves as the foundation for Villa Aldobrandini. Via Nazionale, defined as the greatest street of urban remodelling of the “New Rome”, belongs to two districts: from Piazza della Repubblica to the intersection with Via delle Quattro Fontane, it belongs to the Castro Pretorio district; from the above-mentioned intersection to Via XXIV Maggio, it belongs to the Monti district. Along this famous street, the Capital’s most elegant and renowned stores are located.
On Foot (900 metres; 12 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel until you reach the intersection with Via Cernaia. Turn left and continue down the street crossing Piazza delle Finanze until you reach the intersection with Via Giuseppe Romita. Turn left and proceed to Piazza Della Repubblica. Take the 2nd right onto Via Nazionale.
By Public Transport (1.6 Km)
Proceed along Via Palestro towards Via Montebello. Turn right onto Via Montebello and right again onto Via Castelfidardo. Turn left onto Via XX Settembre and left again to remain on Via XX Settembre. At the public bus stop, take bus 82 towards Termini for 2 stops. Continue along Via Vittorio Emanuele Orlando and take the 1st right at the traffic circle onto Via Nazionale.

Opera House
The Opera House of Rome (Teatro dell'Opera di Roma) is a theatre in Rome reserved for opera and ballet productions. It is also known as Teatro Costanzi, after its architect. Built in a Neo-Renaissance style, the theatre was inaugurated in the presence of the king of Italy in 1880. In 1926, it was purchased by the City Council, which took over its management. Expansion and restoration work was then entrusted to the architect Marcello Piacentini, who added an additional tier of boxes to the three already existing and installed a magnificent chandelier of Murano glass, today considered to be the biggest in the world. Piacentini conducted additional work of expansion and restoration on the structure in 1956. The changes included the addition of a foyer, offices and the remodelling of the façade and were completed in 1960.
Today, the theatre, renowned for its excellent acoustics, has a seating capacity of about 2,200.
On Foot (1.1 km; 13 minutes)
Proceed down Via Palestro towards Via Montebello. Turn right onto Via Gaeta, and continue for about 500 meters. Turn right onto Viale Enrico de Nicola and follow it until you reach Largo Villa Peretti. Take Via del Viminale for about 150 meters and turn right onto Via Torino. Turn right once more onto Piazza Beniamino Gigli. The entrance to the theatre is located at number 7.
By Public Transport (12 minutes)
Head to the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop. Take the train in the “Laurentina” direction and get off at the “Termini” stop. Cross Piazza dei Cinquecento towards Via Giovanni Giolitti; continue straight to Via Cavour and turn right onto Via Giovanni Amendola. After about 200 meters, turn left onto Via del Viminale. Finally, turn right after 150 meters to arrive to your destination.

Via Veneto and Piazza Barberini
Via Vittorio Veneto, usually called Via Veneto, is a street in Rome that runs from Piazza Barberini uphill to Porta Pinciana in the Ludovisi district. In its beginning, this street separates the Ludovisi from the Colonna district.
Designed at the end of the 19th century, it owes its fame, above all, to its role as the centre of high society life in the 1950’s and 60’s, thanks to its numerous cafes and hotels frequented by celebrities and celebrity wannabes. Its fame was further cemented by Federico Fellini’s film, La Dolce Vita.
Palazzo Margherita, which houses the Embassy of the United States of America, is located about half way down the street.
Piazza Barberini takes its name from Palazzo Barberini, which overlooks it. The Triton Fountain (Fontana del Tritone), created by Gian Lorenzo Bernini in 1643 on commission of Pope Urban VIII Barberini, is located at its centre. The fountain, one of Rome’s most beautiful, is made of travertine and depicts Triton supported by four dolphins with the two coats of arms of the Barnerini family between their tales. The Fountain of the Bees (Fontana delle Api), an animal that symbolizes the Barberini family, is located at the corner with Via Veneto.
On Foot (1.4 km; 16 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and continue all the way down Via Palestro. Turn left onto Via XX Settembre. Continue down the street until you reach Via Antonio Salandra; turn right and continue until Via Giosuè Carducci. Turn left, walk 120 meters and then proceed down Via di San Nicola da Tolentino. After about 400 meters, turn right onto Piazza Barberini.
By Public Transport (16 Minutes)
Walk to the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop. Take the train in the “Laurentina” direction and get off at the next stop, “Termini”. Follow the directions towards A Line. Take the train in the “Battistini” direction and get off at the second stop, “Barberini”.

Church of St. Peter in Chains
The Church of St. Peter in Chains, also known as Basilica Eudoxiana (after the Roman Empress Licinia Eudoxia), is known above all for the tomb of Pope Julius II with its famous sculpture of Moses by Michelangelo.
The basilica was constructed in 442 near the Baths of Titus at the base Esquilino Hill, over an older Christian religious centre called “titulus apostolorum”. The empress had the church build to house the chains (“vincula” in Latin) of St. Peter, which her mother, the Empress Aelia Eudocia, received as a gift from Bishop Juvenal of Jerusalem during her visit to the Holy Land, together with the chains that bound the saint in the Marmertine Prison. According to legend, when Pope Leo I brought the chains together to compare them, they merged into one, becoming inseparable.
Moses is a marble sculpture (235 cm tall) by Michelangelo. Dated to about 1513-1515, it was retouched in 1542. Among the first statues completed for the Pope’s mausoleum project, it was also the only one among those initially envisioned to be used in the final, full-size composition, which only saw the light of day after forty years of troubles.
Due to its vigour, anatomical perfection and towering nature (sculpted twice life-size), Moses is one of the most famous sculptures by Michelangelo and of western sculpture in general: an archetypical example of that “Michelangean terribilità” seen in his best works.
On Foot (2 km; 24 minutes)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and turn right after about 120 metres onto Via Gaeta. Walk all the way down and turn right onto Viale Enrico de Nicola. After about 150 metres, walk around Piazza dei Cinquecento until you reach Via Cavour; follow it for one kilometre and turn left onto “Salita dei Borgia” (Borgia’s Climb). At the top, turn left once more onto Piazza di San Pietro in Vincoli.
By Public Transport (16 Minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro until you reach the intersection with Via San Martino Della Battaglia. Turn left and continue to the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop. Take the train in the “Laurentina” direction and get off after 2 stops at the “Cavour” stop. Continue along Via Cavour in the southwest direction, towards Piazza della Suburra; turn left onto “Salita dei Borgia” (Borgia’s Climb). At the top, turn left once more onto Piazza di San Pietro in Vincoli.

MACRO – Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome
The Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome (MACRO) is part of the museum system run by the City Council of Rome. Located close to Porta Pia, in the Nomentano neighbourhood of Rome, it was designed by the French architect Odile Decq. The MACRO art collection includes about 600 pieces, primarily from the second half of the 20th century, by Italian artists such as Carla Accardi, Antonio Sanfilippo, Achille Perilli, Piero Dorazio, Leoncillo, Ettore Colla, Mario Ceroli, Pino Pascali, Tano Festa, Mario Schifano, Titina Maselli and Mimmo Rotella.
On Foot (1.1 km; 13 minutes)
Go left upon exiting the hotel and follow Via Palestro towards Via XX Settembre. At the end of the street, turn right onto Piazzale di Porta Pia. Cross the square and turn onto Via Ancona to the left; after 150 meters, turn right onto Piazza Alessandria. Keep right and take Via Mantova; at the end of the street, turn right onto Via Nizza.
By Public Transport (10 Minutes)
At the hotel entrance, take Via Montebello and follow it to Via Goito. Turn right. Walk to the GOITO- VENTI SETTEMBRE bus stop and take bus 38 for 3 stops. Get off at the NIZZA- VIALE REGINA MARGHERITA stop. Walk about 70 metres to the museum entrance.

MAXXI Museum – National Museum of the 21st Century Arts
MAXXI – the National Museum of the 21st Century Arts is a contemporary art museum designed by the architect Zaha Hadid and run by a homonymous foundation of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities. The museum was designed as a multidisciplinary space committed to experimentation and innovation in the fields of the arts and architecture. MAXXI is composed of two museums, MAXXI arts and MAXXI architecture, with collections that are augmented through both direct acquisition of works as well as commissioned projects, themed competitions, awards for younger artists, donations and entrusted works. From 3 September 2013, the museum’s artistic director is the art critic Hou Hanru.
In addition to the two museums, MAXXI hosts an auditorium, a library with a specialized multimedia collection, a bookshop, a cafeteria, a coffee bar/restaurant, and galleries for temporary exhibitions, performances and educational events. The large square that defines the exterior space can host artwork and live events.
By Public Transport (38 Minutes)
Upon exiting from the hotel, take Via Montebello until Via Castelfidardo; turn right. Walk 250 meters and turn left onto Via Venti Settembre. Walk all the way down the street and turn right onto Via Antonio Salandra. Follow it to Via Piemonte. At the PIEMONTE- CARDUCCI bus stop, take bus 910 for 15 stops and get off at the FLAMINIA- RENI stop. Continue northward along Via Flaminia. Turn left onto Via Guido Reni. After about 200 meters, you will arrive to the Museum entrance.

Auditorium Parco della Musica
Parco della Musica auditorium is a multifunctional complex in Rome designed to host different musical and cultural events. It was inaugurated on 21 April 2002 with the opening of Sinopoli Hall; on 21 December of the same year, the rest of the complex was opened and the Great Hall (called Santa Cecilia) was inaugurated with a live concert by Myung-Whun Chung. It extends over an area covering 55,000 m² in the Flaminio neighbourhood, between Villa Glori, Parioli hill and the Olympic Village; it was designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano. The main spaces of the complex are composed of the three concert halls located in buildings of varying size and shapes reminiscent of beetles. The three halls are covered by sheets of lead and arranged at right angles around an open-air amphitheatre, the Cavea, which can seat about 3,000 spectators. The surrounding grounds are occupied by other buildings, which do not exceed the Cavea in height: service buildings, recording studios, and rehearsal halls. The entire building complex is surrounded by a vast accessible garden. From here, between the Santa Cecilia Hall and the Sinopoli Hall, the remnants of a Roman Villa, discovered during construction (its uncovering lead to substation modification of the original project), are visible. The artefacts uncovered at the site are displayed in a small museum bellow the Cavea. In addition to the three concert halls, the complex also includes the Studio Theatre, three recording studios, and the foyer (which is actually a common atrium for the three halls). A coffee bar, bar/cafeteria and bar/restaurant (with access from the street), as well as a large bookshop have also been opened. The complex also hosts the offices of the Music Foundation for Rome (Fondazione Musica per Roma), which manages the complex, and the National Academy of Santa Cecilia, for which it is the main campus.
By Public Transport (33 Minutes)
Upon exiting from the hotel, take Via Montebello until Via Castelfidardo; turn right. Walk 250 meters and turn left onto Via XX Settembre. Walk all the way down the street and turn right onto Via Antonio Salandra. Follow it to Via Piemonte. At the PIEMONTE- CARDUCCI bus stop, take bus 910 for 13 stops. Get off at the DE COUBERTIN- ARGENTINA stop. Continue eastward along Viale Pietro De Coubertin and take the 1st right at the traffic circle, onto Via Pietro de Coubertin. The entrance to the Auditorium is 170 meters away.

Tiber Island and the Roman Ghetto
The Tiber Island (also known as Insula Tiberina, Insula Tiberis, Insula Aesculapi, Isola dei Due Ponti (Island of Two Bridges), Licaonia, Isola di San Bartolomeo (Island of St. Bartholomew), or simply as Insula) is the Tiber’s only urban island, located in the centre of Rome. It is linked to the two banks of the Tiber by Ponte Cestio and Ponte Fabricio. According to legend, the island was formed in 510 BC over sheaves (bundles of grain stalks) of wheat reaped at Campus Martius (Field of Mars), which belonged to King Tarquin, during a revolt; however, some studies suggest that the island is much older than this event. Due its isolation from the daily bustle of the city, it was chosen to host the Temple of Asclepius, the god of medicine, whose cult was introduced in 292 BC following a plague. In the first half of the 1st century AD, a square monument reminiscent of a ship, positioned parallel to the bridges of Fabrico and Cestino, and to Vicus Censorius, which linked the brides to the island’s interior, was constructed. The bow of this ship, seen in blocks of travertine covering the peperino interior and some decorative elements depicting Asclepius with his serpent and a bull’s head, possibly used for docking, is still visible to this day. At the centre, stood an obelisk meant to symbolize the main mast, a commemoration of the arrival of the cult to Epidaurus in 292 BC. In fact, two years earlier, a few wise men travelled to the Greek city to consult the god after a grave plague. According to legend, a serpent – symbol of the god – left the temple and snuck on board. Once in Rome, the serpent slithered onto the island and made it its home. After the construction of a temple dedicated to the god, it is said that the plague mysteriously ceased. According to a different version, Campus Martius, the Field of Mars, did not belong to the Tarquin family, but was instead consecrated by the Vestal Virgin Tarquinia. In the 10th century, Emperor Otto III constructed a church dedicated to Saints Adalbert, Paulinus and Bartholomew over the ruins of the Temple of Asclepius.
Fatebenefratelli Hospital, located in front of the Basilica of St. Bartholomew, was founded by the followers of San Giovanni di Dio in 1583, and modernized by Cesare Bazzani from 1930 to 1934. The Church of San Giovanni Calibita, built over the remnants of the Temple of Iuppiter Iurarius and consecrated around 1870, is located to the left. The façade, designed in 1640, is the work of Luigi Barattoni. It was completed by Romano Carapecchia in 1711.
The Jewish Ghetto of Rome is one of the oldest ghettos in the world. In fact, it was formed 40 years after that of Venice, which is the oldest. The term “ghetto” derives from the name of a Venetian quarter, where a foundry (gheto in the Venetian dialect) was located and in which the Jews of the city were forced to reside. Initially, the ghetto had two sets of doors that were closed at sunset and reopened at dawn. With the extension and increase in population of the ghetto, the number of entries was successively augmented to three, than five and finally to eight. On 20 September 1870, a Jewish officer from Piedmont was given the honour of commanding the cannon fire that breached the Roman walls at Porta Pia. With the annexation of Rome to the Kingdom of Italy, the temporal power of the Popes ended, the ghettos were abolished once and for all and the Jews were given the same rights as other Italian citizens.
By Public Transport (30 Minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, head towards Piazza dei Cinquecento. At the bus terminal, head for the H (DEI CAPASSO) bus stop and take it for 5 stops; get off at the FORO OLITORIO stop. Proceed westward on Via del Foro Olitorio towards Piazza di Monte Savello. Turn right onto Lungotevere dei Pierleoni; after 100 meters, turn left to your destination.

Janiculum – Acqua Paola Fountain
The Janiculum is a Roman hill overlooking the right bank of the Tiber and reaching a maximum height of 88 meters. According to tradition, the hill was named after the god Janus, who it was said founded a town here known by the name of Janiculum. The hill is said to have been occupied and annexed to Rome by Ancus Marcius, who fortified it and linked it to the city by Ponte Sublicio over which an ancient road crossing the hill and originating in Etruria was to pass. This road would subsequently become the Aurelian Way. Not included in the ancient Servian Walls, it was partially included inside the Aurelian Walls. A portion of the Janiculum was covered by sacred woods consecrated, with a Temple to the ancient divinity Furrina. Another, later site of cultural interest is the Sanctuary of Isis on the eastern slope, on today’s Via Dandolo. The site is picturesque but poorly maintained and often closed; artefacts from the site are currently on exposition as part of the Egyptian collection of Palazzo Altemps. In the 17th century, the hill was included in the walls constructed by Pope Urban VIII, which for this reason came to be called the Janiculum Walls.
The site of the 1849 short, heroic defensive by the Roman Republic against the French called by Pope Pius IX to take Rome for him, the Janiculum became a large public park and a sort of memorial to the Renaissance after the unification of Italy.
At the top of the hill (practically at the foot of the Garibaldi Statue), since 24 January 1904, stands a cannon that fires a blank shot at noon. On the rare days when the capital is less noisy (particularly on Sundays or in August), cannon shots can be heard as far as the Esquiline Hill.
The Fountain of Acqua Paola, also called Fontanone (big fountain), (extolled in the Oscar-winning film “La Grande Bellezza”) is located at the spot where Via Garibaldi reaches the top of the Juniculum Hill, a short distance before Porta San Pancrazio. It marks the termination of the Acqua Paola Aqueduct restored in 1608-1610 by Pope Paul V. Commissioned to Giovanni Fontana, who constructed it in 1611-1612 in collaboration with Flaminio Ponzio, the fountain closely resembles the Acqua Felice fountain. Marking the termination of the Acqua Felice aqueduct, this fountain was also constructed by Giovanni Fontana on the wishes of Pope Sixtus V in 1587.
By Public Transport (50 Minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, head towards Piazza dei Cinquecento. At the bus terminal, head for the H (DEI CAPASSO) bus stop and take it for 7 stops; get off at the TRASTEVERE-MINISTERO ISTRUZIONE stop. Cross the street and at the TRASTEVERE-MINISTERO ISTRUZIONE stop take bus 115 for 5 stops. Get off at the PASSEGGIATA GIANICOLO-VILLA CORSINI stop.

Quirinal Palace and the Scuderie del Quirinale
The Quirinal Palace stands on a hill of the same name in Rome and faces a square bearing the same name. It is the official residence of the President of the Italian Republic and one of the symbols of the Italian State. It is one of the capital’s most important buildings both from an artistic and a political point of view. Work on the palace began in 1583 with distinguished masters of Italian art such as Pietro da Cortona, Domenico Fontana, Alessandro Specchi, Ferdinando Fuga, Carlo Maderno, Giovanni Paolo Pannini and Guido Reni contributing to its construction and decoration. Currently, it also hosts a large fragment of a fresco by Melozzo da Forlì. From 1870, it served as the summer residence of the Pope later becoming the Royal Palace of the Savoy family. With the proclamation of the Republic following a popular referendum of 2 June 1946, the building became the seat of the Head of the Republican State.
The Scuderie del Quirinale (Quirinal Stables) building was constructed in 1722-1732, and is located in front of the presidential residence, facing Piazza del Quirinale. Its first plan was authored by Alessandro Specchi, who was commissioned by Pope Innocent XIII at the beginning of the 18th century to design a replacement for a building constructed by Carlo Fontana. In 1730, on the death of Innocent XIII, the new Pope, Clement XII, entrusted Ferdinando Fugo the task of completing the building. The building continued to be used as stables, as originally designed, until 1938, when it was transformed into a garage. Between 1997 and 1999, it was completely restored in line with a project by the Friulian architect Gae Aulenti. Now designed to be large expositional space (about 1500 m²), it was inaugurated by President Ciampi and handed over to the City Council of Rome. Currently it hosts large exhibitions of international acclaim. It also hosts, together with those at the Vittoriano Museum Complex, some of Rome’s most visited temporary art exhibitions.
On Foot (1.5 km; 18 minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, head left along Via Palestro towards Via XX Settembre. At the end of the street, turn left and continue down Via XX Settembre. Cross Piazza di San Bernardo and follow Via del Quirinale. You will reach your destination after 270 meters.
By Public Transport (50 Minutes)
Go right upon exiting the hotel and after about 120 meters, turn onto Via Gaeta. Proceed for 250 metres and then, turn right onto Via San Martino della Battaglia. At the traffic circle, head for the INDIPENDENZA bus stop. Take bus 85 going towards ARCO DI TRAVERTINO for 2 stops; get off at the REPUBBLICA stop and transfer to bus 64 going towards PIAZZA DELLA STAZIONE SAN PIETRO; stay on for 3 stops and get off at the NAZIONALE-PALAZZO ESPOSIZIONI stop. Continue along Via Nazionale towards Via Milano. After about 100 metres, turn left onto Via Piacenza. Then, turn left again onto Via Ferrara and then right onto Via del Quirinale.

St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican
The Vatican’s St. Peter’s Basilica is the largest of the four Papal basilicas of Rome and is often described as the greatest church of the world and the centre of Catholicism. However, it is not a Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Rome as this title is born by the Basilica of St. John the Lateran, which is also the higher in rank being the Mother and the Head of all Churches in the City and the World. Because it is the Papal Chapel, located adjacent to the Papal Palace, St. Peter’s Basilica plays host to the main functions of the Catholic faith and is therefore the site of papal functions such as Christmas, Easter, the rights of the Holy Week, the proclamation of new Popes, the funerals of those that have passed away, the opening and closing of Jubilees, and the canonization of new saints. Under Pope Pius IX, it hosted the meetings of the 1st Vatican Council and under Pope John XXIII and Paul VI, those of the 2nd Vatican Council. The original St. Peter’s Basilica, a building of dimensions comparable to that of today, was built around 320 by Emperor Constantine on the spot where, according to legend, St. Peter was buried.
The long process that would eventually lead to the complete replacement of the original Constantinian basilica took about two hundred years and involved many Popes and many artists (Bramante, Michelangelo, Bernini). The dome designed by Michelangelo amazes for its size and harmony, characteristics that can be appreciated after the difficult but gratifying climb, which allows visitors to admire both its interior and exterior at close quarters.
An absolute must-see masterpiece among all those hosted in the basilica, is Michelangelo’s Pieta. A sculpture that has astonished for centuries with its technical perfection and emotiveness. A magnificent colonnade of 284 Doric columns and 88 pilasters in Tivoli travertine surround St. Peter’s Basilica as if to embrace the visiting faithful.
By Public Transport (46 Minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, head towards Piazza dei Cinquecento. At the bus terminal, go to the bus 64 (PIAZZA DELLA STAZIONE SAN PIETRO) stop and take it for 15 stops getting off at the CAVALLEGGERI-SAN PIETRO stop. Continue east along Via di Porta Cavalleggeri towards Via delle Fornaci; after 100 metres, turn left onto Piazza del Sant'uffizio. Turn right onto Via Paolo VI and continue onto Largo degli Alicorni to arrive to Piazza San Pietro.

Basilica of St. Jon in Lateran
The Sacrosanct Cathedral Papal Major Roman Archibasilica of the Most Holy Saviour and Saints John the Baptist and the Evangelist at the Lateran (Sacrosanta Cattedrale Papale Arcibasilica Romana Maggiore del Santissimo Salvatore e dei Santi Giovanni Battista ed Evangelista al Laterano), the Mother and Head of All the Churches of the City and the World is a cathedral of the Diocese of Rome, currently overseen by Cardinal Agostino Vallini, the Vicar General for his Holiness. It is the first of the four papal basilicas and the oldest and most important basilica of the West. Situated on Caelian Hill, the basilica and the vast complex surrounding it (including the Apostolic Palace of the Lateran, Palazzo dei Canonici, the Pontifical Roman Major Seminary and the Pontifical Lateran University) holds special extraterritorial privileges granted by the state to the Holy Seat, which has full and exclusive jurisdiction over the basilica grounds, despite being located on the territory of the Italian Republic. The Basilica stands on the spot where a basilica erected by Constantine around 314 AD once stood, on land that was by then already the property of the Lateran noble family, for which the whole area is named. Repeatedly damaged and restored, the basilica has been continuously embellished over the course of the centuries. Its 18th century façade, built by Alessandro Galilei, is a prelude to its magnificent interior created by Borromini, who was entrusted with the restoration of the church’s interior by Pope Innocent X Pamphili ahead of the 1650 Jubilee. However, the overall plan, consisting of five naves, was conserved, as well as the incredibly rich, 16th century coffer ceiling over the central nave.
By Public Transport (26 Minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, take Via Montebello to Via Castelfidardo and turn right. Go to the VOLTURNO-CERNAIA bus stop and take bus 16 towards COSTAMAGNA for 8 stops; get off at the PORTA SAN GIOVANNI stop and walk to Piazza di San Giovanni in Laterano.

Basilica of St. Paul Outside-the-Walls
The Basilica of St. Paul Outside-the-Walls is the second largest after that of St. Peter’s in the Vatican. It stands on Via Ostiense, close to the left bank of the Tiber and about two kilometres outside the Aurelian Walls (hence its name) at the height of Porta San Paolo. It was built on the place where, according to legend, the Apostle Paul was buried (about 3 kilometres from Tre Fontane (Three Fountains), the site where he was martyred by decapitation); the tomb of the saint is located below the main altar, called the Papal Altar. For this reason, the basilica has always been a pilgrimage destination. Since 1300, the first Holy Year, it is part of the Jubilee itinerary to gain indulgence and is where Right of the Opening of the Holy Door is celebrated. From the 18th century, the care of liturgy and the votive candle on the tomb of the apostle has been entrusted to Benedictine monks from the adjoining Abbey of St. Paul Outside-the-Walls.
By Public Transport (21 Minutes)
Head towards the B Line “Castro Pretorio” metro stop; take the train in the LAURENTINA direction for 7 stops. Get off at the BASILICA SAN PAOLO stop and proceed along Via Ostiense towards Viale Ferdinando Baldelli for about 350 metres.

Basilica of Saint Mary Major
The Basilica of Saint Mary Major (Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore), also known as Our Lady of the Snows, Liberian Basilica (after its founder Pope Liberius) and Saint Mary of the Crib (because it hosts within its walls that which is believed to be the planks of the crib into which Christ was placed on the night of Christmas), is located at the top of the Esquiline Hill and is the only basilica to have preserved its original paleo-Christian structure, though embellished by later additions. Its full name is Papal Patriarcal Major Archpriestal Archbasilica of Saint Mary Major (Papale Arcibasilica Patriarcale Maggiore Arcipretale di Santa Maria Maggiore). The church was built over a previous church financed by a rich Roman patrician, Giovanni. According to legend, Giovanni and his wife, who were childless, decided to dedicate a church to the Virgin Mary, who appeared to them in a dream on the night between Monday the 4th and Tuesday the 5th of August 352 AD.
The Madonna told them that a miracle would indicate to them the place where to build the church. On the following day, Pope Liberius had the same dream. He then travelled to Esquiline Hill and found it covered in snow. The Pope traced the perimeter of the building himself and the construction of the church was paid for by the couple.
To this day, every 5th day of August, the miracle of the snow is re-enacted with a celebration during which white petals are thrown from the peaks of the basilica producing a truly evocative effect that is a must-see.
On Foot (1.4 km; 17 minutes)
Upon exiting the hotel, proceed down Via Palestro towards Via Gaeta. At the intersection, turn right onto Via San Martino della Battaglia. Continue straight onto Via Solferino and then onto Viale de Nicola Enrico for 59 metres. Cross Piazza dei Cinquecento, turn left onto Via Giovanni Giolitti and then right onto Via Gioberti. Walk straight for about 200 meters until you reach your destination.

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